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Nuclear

The Islamic Republic doesn’t need to cheat to get the bomb. Indeed, it has every incentive to hope that the deal is enforced.

By Mark Dubowitz

WSJ- March 22, 2017 - President Donald Trump promised to rigorously and radically enforce the Iran nuclear agreement, which he called “the worst deal ever negotiated.” It sounds tough, but it’s an approach that plays into the hands of the Iranian mullahs.

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action presents the Trump administration with a bedeviling paradox: The greater the focus on enforcement, the higher the likelihood Iran will emerge with nuclear weapons.

REUTERS - Mar 17, 2017 -  Iran has challenged the need for it to ship sensitive material abroad if its stock exceeds a limit set by its nuclear deal with major powers.

The challenge raises the prospect of a confrontation with the new U.S. administration of President Donald Trump because diplomats say Iran is only months away from reaching that cap.

The 2015 deal restricts Iran's atomic activities in exchange for the lifting of sanctions against Tehran.

By Heshmat Alavi

Yukiya Amano, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, recently issued his latest report to the agency’s Board of Governors. At a first glance the text leaves you thinking Iran is honoring the nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, JCPOA.

However, considering the rapid pace of international developments, and US President Donald Trump’s harsh remarks against the nuclear deal,we are seeing Iran going the limits to maintain the JCPOA intact. This is a staunchly different approach from the Obama era.

Institute for Science and International Security by David Albright and Andrea Stricker

On February 24, 2017, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) released its fifth report on Iran’s compliance with United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolution 2231 (2015). UNSCR 2231 codified into international law the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), an agreement reached between the P5+1 and Iran in July 2015 aimed at limiting Iran’s nuclear program. The JCPOA was implemented on January 16, 2016, a date known as Implementation Day.

by David Albright

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) needs to be implemented more effectively, its nuclear conditions strengthened, and its verification improved. Its implementation has been too permissive and tolerant of Iran’s behavior to violate the deal, exploit loopholes, avoid critical verification requirements, and generally push the envelope of allowed behavior. Too often concessions have been made from a misplaced fear that Iran would walk away from the deal or somehow President Rouhani’s presidency needed protecting. However, the deal can be better enforced by the United States without leading to its termination. As a matter of policy, the Trump administration should close key loopholes in the agreement and move to correct its short- and long-term deficiencies.

Daily Caller by Russ Read

A senior Iranian lawmaker is worried that President Donald Trump may leak secret documents related to Iran’s nuclear program.

Alaeddin Boroujerdi, the head of Iran’s parliamentary Commission on Foreign Policy and National Security, claimed that any attempt by Trump to publish documents relating to Iran’s nuclear program from the International Atomic Energy Agency would represent a violation.

“If Trump wants to publish confidential documents exchanged between Iran and the International Atomic Energy Agency,

Fox News - President Trump could come under new pressure to lift the curtain on secret elements of the Iran nuclear deal struck by his predecessor, especially as the Islamic Republic continues its war of words with his administration.

Only days after the Iran nuclear deal was announced in July of 2015, news began to leak out about secret side agreements made between the Islamic Republic and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

 By Roger L Simon

Does anyone know what's really in the Iran nuclear deal with all its unpublished side agreements and secret verbal pledges?

Certainly not the American public, on whose behalf it was putatively negotiated. And probably not most, if not all, members of Congress who were bypassed in its negotiation and "signing" in a manner that doesn't seem remotely constitutional.

Despite the yeoman efforts of Jay Solomon, Omri Ceren and others, the full extent of the deal is still a mystery.

Iran Focus

On July 14, 2015, world powers and Iran reached an agreement over the latter’s illicit nuclear program, which had been the subject of global tensions for more than a decade. The international community had concerns over Iran’s possible goal to obtain nuclear weapons, an allegation that the Iranian regime denied. 

However, a brief look at the history of Iran’s nuclear program gives reason to believe that we haven’t seen the last of Iran’s nuclear ambitions,

Olli Heinonen

Iran announced last week that it would start feeding its first IR-8 centrifuges with uranium hexafluoride gas (UF6). The 2015 Iran nuclear deal states that Tehran’s breakout time (the time needed to enrich uranium enough for a nuclear bomb) is one year, but that is based on Iran only using the first-generation, less-efficient IR-1 centrifuges. With more powerful IR-8s and other advanced centrifuges, Iran could enrich uranium for a weapon much faster. In three to four years, the country could be able to deploy large numbers of advanced centrifuges – if it can convince the international community that its nuclear program is peaceful and that it should be treated like any other nation, without restriction on its nuclear and enrichment activities.