Iran’s withdrawal from JCPOA, a pathetic show game

Iran’s withdrawal from JCPOA, a pathetic show game

By: Ali Latifi

On the first anniversary of the US withdrawal from JCPOA (the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or the 2015 Iran nuclear deal), Hassan Rouhani, ironically, announced partial withdrawal from JCPOA, ostensibly as a reciprocal measure.

 The details of the regime’s withdrawal from JCPOA were announced by its Supreme National Security Council.

According to regime’s decision, it stops exporting enriched uranium stocks and will resume higher uranium enrichment in 60 days if the 4+1 – France, Britain, Germany, China, and Russia, do not take measures to protect Tehran’s oil and banking sectors from the US sanctions.

The threat of partial withdrawal from JCPOA and giving the 60-day ultimatum by the regime raises this question that who is the main addressee.

Iran regime counts on Europe as a potential player to rescue Iran’s economy via saving the nuclear deal after the US withdrawal. In this regard, the regime has been hoping to set up and activate the plan of Instrument in Support of Trade Exchanges (Instex), by the cooperation of the UK, France, and Germany to circumvent the US sanctions. This mechanism has faced serious hurdles because the European companies are reluctant to take the risk of being a target of the US charges and fines for involving in economic cooperation with Iran regime.

Iran regime’s miscalculation; posing by threatening partial withdrawal from JCPOA

In spite of the EU’s commitment to propping the nuclear deal up, the primary European reactions indicate that Iran regime’s ultimatum may put the mullahs at the risk of losing the crucial support that they have been enjoying in the EU.

Reuters reported on Wednesday, May 8, the French government has acknowledged the possibility of either unilateral French sanctions or collective sanctions by the entire EU if Iran ultimately reneges on the JCPOA. Agence France-Presse noted the following day that French army minister Florence Parly had reiterated this point.

Also, the British Foreign Ministry warned the regime of “consequences” for actions in defiance of international will.

More importantly, a joint statement by the representatives of the United Kingdom, France, and Germany, as well as the European Union, specified,  “We reject any ultimatums and will assess Iran’s compliance on the basis of Iran’s performance regarding its nuclear-related commitments under the [nuclear deal] and the [Nonproliferation of Weapons Treaty].”

So, the ball is being thrown to the Iran regime’s court and the threat of partial withdrawal from JCPOA had an opposite of intended effect on the EU policy.      

Beyond any prediction of the event’s tracks, one can point to two important facts regarding the Iran regime. Firstly, this regime is surrounded by internal and international crisis and fears of being toppled.

Secondly, to survive and cling to power with all the violence at its disposal, the regime will not hesitate to ratchet up domestic suppression and accelerate its devastating foreign policy by resorting the means of ransom via restoring nuclear activities.

To overcome the threat to global peace, the international community, particularly the EU, is responsible, and it must withdraw from the nuclear deal and impose tough sanctions on this corrupt regime.

Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, the president-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), subsequent to temporary agreement with P5+1 on Nov. 2013 said that the full implementation of the United Nation Security Council’s Resolutions, in particular, complete stop of enrichment, free access to the IAEA inspectors are necessary steps to prevent mullahs from obtaining the bomb.

Mohammad Mohaddessin, the chairman of the foreign affairs committee for the NCRI, emphasized on the need of total shut down of enrichment, heavy water, and all nuclear sites, exposing military aspects of the nuclear project, and snap inspections of all sites more imperative.”

Ali Latifi: human rights activist and political analyst on Iran and the Middle East.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.