Uniting for Freedom, Democracy & Equality

 “Khuzestan Uprising”

MEK Resistance Units in Iran: Khuzestan Uprising Will Continue Until Regime Collapse

August 9, 2021PMOI/MEK Resistance Units in Iran say that the uprising started in Khuzestan province will continue until the Iranian regime’s collapse. They install posters of the President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) Maryam Rajavi and the Iranian resistance leader Massoud Rajavi in public places.

They wrote:
Isfahan— “Do not leave the risen cities alone… This is an uprising for overthrowing [the regime] and for freedom”
Tonekabon— “It is time to rise all over Iran.”
Mashhad— “Rebels will continue the uprising that started in Khuzestan
Tehran— “Rebels will continue the uprising that started in Khuzestan”
Tehran— “The oppressed and thirsty province of Khuzestan has risen to fight”
Tehran— “Down with Khamenei, Viva Rajavi”
Tehran— “Down with Khamenei, Viva Rajavi”
Tehran— “Down with the oppressor, be it the Shah or Ali Khamenei”
Tehran— “It is time for all cities in Iran to rise.”

August 9, 2021 - PMOI/MEK Resistance Units in Iran say that the uprising started in Khuzestan province will continue until the Iranian regime’s collapse.
Activities by MEK Resistance Units in Various Cities Across Iran – August 2021

Shahr-e Kord— “Down with the dictator”
Shahr-e Kord— “Uprisings must be expanded”
Shiraz— “Down with Khamenei and Raisi
Karaj— “Down with the oppressor, be it the Shah or Ali Khamenei”
Yasuj— “Down with Khamenei and Raisi, Viva Rajavi”
Yasuj— “Iran will rise against mullahs”
Yasuj— “The Iranian people are aware and hate both Shah and mullahs”
Yasuj— “Iran will not get better as long as mullahs are in power.”

Paris Rally by Supporters of the Iranian Resistance to Support the Khuzestan Uprising-July 31, 2021

On Saturday, July 31, 2021, in Paris, Iranians, supporters of the People’s Mojahedin Organization(PMOI/MEK) and the National Council of Resistance of Iran(NCRI), gathered to support the Khuzestan uprising.


Iranians, supporters of the Iranian resistance in Paris showed their solidarity with the ongoing protests in Iran, chanting “Tehran, Khuzestan, Unity Unity!”

It is reminded that the widespread protests and uprisings in different cities of Khuzestan Province (southwest Iran) started on Thursday night, July 15, 2021, due to water shortage. But the response of the religious dictatorship to this basic demand was repression and firing on the people.

Rallies by Iranians, Supporters of the MEK in the Netherlands, Sweden, U.S. & Canada in Support of the Khuzestan Uprising

Rallies by Iranians, the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran(PMOI/MEK) in the Netherlands, Sweden, the United States and Canada in Support of the Khuzestan Uprising on 25 and 26 July 2021

On 26 July 2021, Iranians, supporters of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran(PMOI/MEK) demonstrate in The Hague in front of the Dutch Parliament in support of the Khuzestan uprising.

Iranian expatriates held a demonstration supporting brave protests throughout Iran that began from Khuzestan province on July 15 and continues to spread to numerous provinces across the country.

July 26, 2021– Also, Iranians, supporters of the MEK demonstrate in the United States, Atlanta in support of the Khuzestan uprising.

In addition, on July 25, 2021, in Sweden(Stockholm), U.S.(Dallas) and Canada(Montreal) Iranians held rallies in support of the Khuzestan uprising.

Iranians, Supporters of the MEK in the U.S. (Dallas, Texas) Rallied to Support Khuzestan Uprising

On Saturday, July 24, 2021, The Iranian American Community of North Texas (IACNT), supporters of the People’s Mojahedin Organization(PMOI/MEK) and the National Council of Resistance of Iran(NCRI), gathered to support the Khuzestan uprising.

The Iranian American Community of North Texas (IACNT) gathered to support Khuzestan uprising.

They said: This round of Iran Protests started due to lack of water in Khuzestan, but the real goal is regime change by the people of Iran.

We rallied on July 24 to support the Iranian people in their quest for a free Iran.


When the Iranian regime kills innocent peaceful protesters, we can not be quiet. We must condemn such acts to prevent further bloodshed. UN Human Rights Chief says, “Water is indeed a right.”


The latest round of Iran Protests erupted because people in Khuzestan did not have water. Not only, Iran’s regime did not provide water for them, but killed a few instead.

So far, more than 12 peaceful protesters have been killed by Iran’s security forces in the Protests. Such brutalities must be condemned.


The Iranian people came to the streets for their basic human rights, but they were met brutally by the regime’s forces.
Our Community supports Iran Protests and condemns the regime.

It is reminded that the widespread protests and uprisings in different cities of Khuzestan Province (southwest Iran) started on Thursday night, July 15, 2021, due to water shortage. But the response of the religious dictatorship to this basic demand was repression and firing on the people.

In Northwestern Iran, Tabriz and Zanjan Protested in Support of the Khuzestan Uprising

July 25, 2021: The Secretariat of the National Council of Resistance of Iran(NCRI) issued a statement regarding the protests that took place in the cities of Tabriz and Zanjan in northwestern Iran in support of the Khuzestan uprising.

The full text of the statement is as follows:

On the 10th day of the Khuzestan uprising, the people and youth of Tabriz took to the streets, chanting slogans against the clerical regime’s oppression and expressing solidarity with the Khuzestan uprising.

The demonstrators chanted, “Azerbaijan is awake, it supports Khuzestan,” “Neither Shah nor Khamenei, we are patriotic,” “We are ready to sacrifice our lives, we are Babak’s soldiers.” (Bābak Khorramdin was one of the prominent Iranian revolutionary leaders, fighting against the Abbasid Caliphate for freedom) The repressive State Security Force (SSF) and the special anti-riot units attacked the protesters, but the youth resisted them while chanting, “We will not accept humiliation, shame on you, shame on you,” and forced them to retreat.

Meanwhile, in Zanjan and Bojnurd, people and the youth took to the streets in solidarity with the Khuzestan uprising. They chanted, “Iranians die but will not accept humiliation.”

The cleric, Mohammad-Ali Nekounam, Khamenei’s representative in Shahrekord, said in this week’s Friday Prayer, “The important thing is that the Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK) are still on their feet, and even today in Ahvaz, in Khuzestan, and one can see their footprint in Ahvaz and Khuzestan in creating chaos.”

Amnesty International: Using Live Ammunition to Crush Protests in Khuzestan Uprising In Iran -at Least 8 People Have Been Killed

Amnesty International released a report on 23 July 2021. In this report, Amnesty strongly condemned the repression of the people of Khuzestan province in southwestern Iran, who have been protesting wildly since July 15 due to the lack of water. In the protests, the people being shot by the Iranian regime’s security forces, which killed at least eight people.

The details of this report are as follows:

Iran: Security forces use live ammunition and birdshot to crush Khuzestan protests

Iran’s security forces have deployed unlawful force, including by firing live ammunition and birdshot, to crush mostly peaceful protests taking place across the southern province of Khuzestan, Amnesty International said today. Video footage from the past week, coupled with consistent accounts from the ground, indicate security forces used deadly automatic weapons, shotguns with inherently indiscriminate ammunition, and tear gas to disperse protesters.

Since protests over severe water shortages erupted in Khuzestan on 15 July, security forces have killed at least eight protesters and bystanders, including a teenage boy, in seven different cities. According to official statements, one police official was also shot dead in Mahshahr. Scores of people, including children, have been injured, including by birdshot, and several are hospitalized in critical condition due to gunshot wounds. Security and intelligence forces have swept up dozens of protesters and activists, including many from the Ahwazi Arab minority, in mass arrests.

“Using live ammunition against unarmed protesters posing no imminent threat to life is a horrifying violation of the authorities’ obligation to protect human life. Protesters in Iran who take to the streets to voice legitimate economic and political grievances face a barrage of gunfire, tear gas, and arrests,” said Diana Eltahawy, Deputy Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

“Iran’s authorities have a harrowing track record of using unlawful lethal force. The events unfolding in Khuzestan have chilling echoes of November 2019, when security forces unlawfully killed hundreds of protesters and bystanders but were never held to account. Ending impunity is vital for preventing further bloodshed.”
Amnesty International calls on the Iranian authorities to immediately cease the use of automatic weapons and shotguns firing birdshot, which are indiscriminate, cause grievous and painful injuries and are completely inappropriate for use in all policing situations. They must also release all those detained solely for peacefully exercising their right to freedom of expression and assembly and protect all detainees from torture and other ill-treatment. The authorities must also ensure the injured can safely access medical care in hospital without facing arbitrary arrest. Iran’s authorities must also end deliberate ongoing internet disruptions and shutdowns across the province to clamp down on human rights.

Iran has experienced a worsening water crisis in recent years depriving people of their right to clean and safe water and leading to several protests including in Khuzestan. Environmental researchers say the authorities have failed to take adequate action to address the crisis.

Evidence of unlawful use of force

According to analysis by Amnesty International’s weapons expert, the sound of automatic weapons fire can be heard in multiple videos relating to protests in Khuzestan province that have circulated on social media since 15 July, including from the cities of Izeh, Ahvaz, Kut-e Abdollah, Susangerd and Shoushtar.

Video – automatic weapon fire


In other videos, including from Ahvaz, Khorramshahr, Mahshahr, Shavur, Shoush and Susangerd, the sounds of individual shots can be heard, which could be from discharging live ammunition, birdshot, or less-lethal munitions such as kinetic impact projectiles.

Video – single shots fired


In one video, where single shots are audible, security forces wearing anti-riot gear are seen advancing, some of them on motorcycles, towards a gathering of unarmed protesters. As shots are heard, protesters are seen fleeing in the opposite direction. In another video, a member of the security forces is seen firing a shotgun at a target off camera. In one other video, a police official is seen running towards a crowd firing a shotgun as armed members of the security forces nearby shoot grenade launchers.

In at least one video, several armed men are seen chasing a fleeing protester into a quiet side street while a mixture of automatic gunfire and single shots can be heard in the background. The fleeing protester is seen slumping to the ground. According to information received by Amnesty International from an Ahwazi Arab human rights defender, the armed men were members of the security forces who then arrested the protester.

Although Amnesty International was not able to confirm the identities of the shooters in all videos, in some of the footage, protesters at the scene or those filming can be heard saying that security forces are firing toward protesters or into the air.

In all but two video clips reviewed by Amnesty International, protesters are unarmed and clearly pose no threat to life that would meet the threshold for the use of lethal force under international law. Extensive video evidence indicates the demonstrations were mostly peaceful though in some places, as the crackdown by security forces escalated, some protesters put up roadblocks with burning tyres, engaged in stone-throwing and arson and damaged state vehicles. In some videos, gunfire is heard while protesters are escaping and could not, therefore, represent any danger to the security forces.

The above-mentioned two video clips were published by Iran’s state-affiliated Fars News Agency, said to be from Ahvaz on 20 July. The first shows a single armed man shooting off camera standing beside a group of unarmed men; the other shows a man on the rear seat of a moving motorcycle shooting into air.

While the circumstances surrounding the incidents shown in these clips remain unclear to Amnesty International, in the course of extensive documentation of the crackdowns on nationwide protests in November 2019 and other protests in recent years, the organization has received numerous eyewitness accounts indicating the authorities’ use of plainclothes agents to pose as armed or violent protesters.

Identified victims

According to information obtained from informed sources, security forces have killed at least eight protesters and bystanders, including a teenage boy, since protests began.

They include Mostafa Asakereh (Naimavi) in Shadegan, Ghassem Naseri (Khozeiri) in Kut-e Abdollah, Isa Baledi and Meysam Achrash in Taleghani, Hamzeh (Farzad) Fereisat in Ahvaz, Mehdi Chanani in Shoush, Hamid Mojadam (Jokari) in Chamran, and a teenage boy, Hadi Bahmani, in Izeh. The deaths resulted from incidents on 16, 19, 20 and 21 July.

Human rights defenders on the ground have reported that in various cities across the province, many injured protesters are not seeking hospital treatment due to fear of arrests. A human rights defender told Amnesty International that on 21 July, security and intelligence agents arrested several injured protesters from a hospital in Susangerd.

Read more: https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2021/07/iran-security-forces-use-live-ammunition-and-birdshot-to-crush-khuzestan-protests/

Iranians, Supporters of the MEK Rallied in Oslo, Gothenburg and Aarhus to Support Khuzestan Uprising

July 21, 2021: Iranians, Supporters of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran(PMOI/ MEK) and the National Council of Resistance of Iran(NCRI) rallied in Norway, Sweden and Denmark in support of the Khuzestan Uprising.

Iranians, supporters of the MEK in Norway(Oslo), Sweden(Gothenburg) and Denmark(Aarhus) rallied in solidarity with their brave compatriots in Khuzestan and demanding accountability for the regime that is killing the protesters.

Iranian dissidents gathered to be the voice of their brave compatriots in Khuzestan and join their call for regime change.

July 22, 2021, London: Rally by Supporters of the MEK and the NCRI in Support of the Khuzestan Uprising

July 22, 2021, London: Iranians supporters of the National Council of Resistance of Iran(NCRI) and the People Mojahedin Organization of Iran(PMOI/MEK) hold a rally in solidarity with the brave people of Khuzestan who are being killed and wounded by the repressive forces of Iran’s regime. They are thirsty for water and freedom.

Rally opposite 10 Downing Street by the supporters of the Iranian democratic opposition NCRI/PMOI in solidarity with the Iranian people’s uprising in Khuzestan in the 8th consecutive day of the brutal killings of the innocent people who are protesting the severe shortage of water.

It is reminded that the widespread protests and uprisings in different cities of Khuzestan Province (southwest Iran) started on Thursday night, July 15, 2021, due to water shortage. But the response of the religious dictatorship to this basic demand was repression and firing on the people.

Rallies by Supporters of the MEK in Canada, Sweden and Germany in Support of the Khuzestan Uprising

July19, 2021: Demonstrations by Iranians, Supporters of the MEK in Canada, Sweden and Germany in Support of the Khuzestan Uprising.

Iranians, supporters of the MEK in Canada(Ottawa, Vancouver, Montreal and Toronto), Sweden(Malmö and Gothenburg) and Germany(Hamburg) rallied in solidarity with their brave compatriots in Khuzestan and demanding accountability for the regime that is killing the protesters.

Iranian dissidents gathered to be the voice of their brave compatriots in Khuzestan and join their call for regime change.

The Uprising in Khuzestan and Other Parts of Iran Necessitates an International Response Against the Mullahs’ Regime

On July 23, 2021, Amnesty International’s deputy director for the Middle East and North Africa commented upon Iran’s regime repressive response to protests over water shortages in the Iranian province of Khuzestan by drawing comparisons to the crackdown on an earlier nationwide uprising. “Iran’s authorities have a harrowing track record of using unlawful lethal force,” Diana Eltahawy said in a statement. “The events unfolding in Khuzestan have chilling echoes of November 2019, when security forces unlawfully killed hundreds of protesters and bystanders but were never held to account.”

“Ending impunity is vital for preventing further bloodshed,” Eltahawy added. It is a sentiment that the international community should have immediately embraced before Iran’s latest crackdown grew more intense and widespread. At the time of the Amnesty statement, only two fatalities had been confirmed among the protesters, but days later the human rights organization reported that at least eight individuals had been killed by gunfire from Iranian security forces. And on July 25, the National Council of Resistance of Iran released its own statement identifying twelve victims by name and reiterating the appeal for international measures intended to hold regime authorities accountable.

“The Iranian Resistance urges the United Nations Secretary-General, the UN Security Council, the European Union, and its member states to condemn these crimes against humanity and take the necessary steps to confront a regime [that has been] committing crimes against humanity for more than four decades,” the statement said. “The leaders of the regime must be brought to justice, and the UN Security Council must initiate any action needed to [achieve] this end.”

This message had already been delivered to the international community several days before the outbreak of the Khuzestan protests, in the form of speeches by NCRI officials and their political supporters at the three-day Free Iran World Summit. In the first of her three speeches at the event, Mrs. Maryam Rajavi President-elect of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) suggested that the Iranian nation was entering a “new era” which would be defined by an historic increase in “the hostility and enmity between the Iranian regime and society.”

The era in question was expected to begin with the inauguration of Ebrahim Raisi as the new president of the Mullahs’ regime, an incident which Mrs. Rajavi said would be a “litmus test” for whether the international community would “engage and deal with this genocidal regime or stand with the Iranian people.” But the unrest preceding that inauguration suggests that the era of increased hostility may have already begun, and that the international community is thus facing its litmus test even earlier than anticipated.

This is not to say that there won’t still be further escalation. In fact, it is precisely because of the escalation that is already underway that entities like Amnesty International recognize such clear parallels between the current demonstrations and the November 2019 uprising. In that case, demonstrations broke out simultaneously across nearly 200 cities and towns, virtually all of them featuring anti-government slogans like “death to the dictator” which had previously been popularized by a similar, though more gradual uprising in the first weeks of 2018. The continuity of this messaging left the regime in dire panic over direct challenges to its hold on power, and security forces responded by opening fire on crowds, killing approximately 1,500 people.

Reports from the current areas of unrest pale in comparison to this, but it bears noting that those reports have been impeded by comprehensive internet service interruptions and other efforts by regime authorities to stem the flow of information. When the effects of those obstructions diminish, it will no doubt be revealed that the regime’s crackdowns were even worse than they appeared at first glance. The NCRI is already reporting that its initial report of a dozen fatalities is only a partial account of the death toll from the first two weeks of unrest. More names will be revealed as their identities are confirmed.

Then again, this latter fact should come as no surprise. Even after 1,500 people were killed in the initial crackdown on the November 2019 uprising, thousands of Iranians proved willing to return to the streets in January 2020, whereupon they once again condemned the entire regime and also took aim at the main perpetrators of the shootings, the Revolutionary Guard (IRGC). This defiance of repression was cited by the NCRI as evidence that the country is fast approaching an inflection point for regime change – an outcome that could easily be accelerated if Western powers merely provided political support to the Resistance movement.

“As far as the international community is concerned,” Mrs. Rajavi said during the Free Iran World Summit, “we ask it to recognize the struggle of the Iranian people to overthrow this regime.” Concrete recommendations came nowhere near to an appeal for direct assistance, but included recommendations for international investigations into the regime’s past crimes against humanity, including those carried out with the assistance of President-elect Ebrahim Raisi.

In 1988, Raisi was a key figure in the “death commissions” that oversaw the mass execution of approximately 30,000 political prisoners, most of them members of the NCRI’s main constituent group, the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK). In 2019, as judiciary chief, Raisi was effectively in charge of the crackdown on that year’s uprising, including not just the shooting incidents but also the torture of political detainees which went on for months afterward.

The PMOI/MEK and the Iranian people have defied all such efforts at repression throughout the 42-year history of the Mullahs’ regime. The current situation of unrest, extending well beyond Khuzestan and focusing as much on the repression itself as on the government’s failure of water management, reinforces this point. Although accounts of the repression may grow increasingly shocking as the unrest persists, it may turn out that the current unrest is building toward another uprising that is similar to November 2019 in terms of the danger that it poses both to the activist community and to the regime.

If and when that happens, the international community will certainly have to take a side in the conflict. And if any policymakers advocate for remaining on the sidelines while still recognizing the theocratic dictatorship as legitimate, then it must be understood that those policymakers are effectively siding with the regime and its violently repressive institutions. As Iran’s civil tensions build, the opportunities for neutrality shrink toward nothingness. As the era of Ebrahim Raisi begins, the international community must reckon with its former silence on Iran’s human rights abuses, and with the real prospect for regime change leading to a free and democratic republic.